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Honored Dead - World War II

ALLEN, Don Earl-Don Earl Allen, Motor Machinist’s Mate, First Class, son of Mr. and Mrs. Everett E. Allen, 423 East Third Street, a veteran of almost four years of Navy service, was serving aboard the submarine Pampano, when it was reported overdue and failed to return from patrol operations in the Pacific Area. On August 2, 1943, the Pompano departed from Midway Island to patrol waters in the vicinity of Hokkaido and Honshu, Japan. A letter received by Machinist Mate Allen’s father from Secretary of the Navy Forrestal is in part as follows, “In view of the additional length of time that has elapsed since your son was reported missing, and because there have been no official nor unconfirmed reports that any of the personnel serving aboard the Pompano survived or were taken prisoners of war, I am reluctantly forced to the conclusion that he is deceased.”

ANDERSON, Irvin Henry-Pharmacist Mate, Second Class, U. S. Navy, Irvin Henry Anderson was taken prisoner by the Japs shortly after Pearl harbor and had been held in Balibid prisoner of war camp until October, 1944, when he was being transferred with other prisoners to Japan in an unmarked prison ship, which is believed to have been sunk by American gun fire. He was born in New Albany, Indiana, March 6, 1919, the only son of Howard and Mary K. Anderson. He attended Eggleston School, Junior High and graduated from Madison High School, class of 1937. He was also a member of Trinity M. E. Church. He enlisted in the Navy May 19, 1938, having been in service about seven years. Before the war his ship, the U. S. S. Blackhawk, operated in the area of the Philippines, and for several months Seaman Anderson served in a hospital in Manila. While a prisoner of war, he wrote the following note, which was found by the army on Corregidor and sent to his mother. “My opinion of the war can surely be of little consequence, but perhaps I can express the feeling of faith that I have in my country, perhaps I can tell to those who may be interested that my morale is high and my belief in final victory is unshaken and my pride in the U. S. A. just as great as the day the war began. It has become my misfortune to become a prisoner of war but I know that somewhere my fellow countrymen are fighting and that they have a pride and faith in their country that cannot be shaken, and that they too, are confident of victory.” A footnote from H. B. Atkinson, Commander, Casualty Section, to Mrs. Anderson said, “You must be proud to realize your son was among those whose faith while imprisoned, and steadfastness to their county’s ideals, will never be forgotten by the American people.”

BADGER, Warren-Private First Class, Warren Badger, was born at Derby, Indiana, May 10, 1926, and was killed in action on Okinawa, May 15, 1945, just five days after his nineteenth birthday.
Private Badger left Fort Ord, California February 15, 1945, having been in service less than a year. He was sent to the Pacific Theater where he met his death on Okinawa. Private Bader was the son of Mrs. Frances Badger Vestal and step-son of Owen Vestal. He was the grandson of Elijah and Sarah Badger, Perry County and of Arve Warren living in Canada. He also leaves three uncles, Wallace Badger, clothing clerk at Madison State hospital, Russell Badger in the Navy and Ernest Badger on a farm in Perry County. He was a member of the Liberty Church, graduate of North Madison High School, class of 1944. He received posthumously the Purple Heart, Combat Infantryman Badge and a Presidential citation. He lies buried on Okinawa.

BLACK, George Kenens-George Kenens Black, Corporal, was born at Madison, Indiana May 16, 1918, son of George Allen and Mary Kenens Black. He attended Lydia Middleton School and graduated with the Madison High School class of 1937, and attended Purdue University. Was a member of the Methodist Church. Before entering the army, he was employed as a boring mill operator at Allison’s, Branch of General Motors at Indianapolis. He was in the glider infantry and had been overseas since July, 1944, and had been in service two years. Corporal Black was killed in action at Mock, Holland, October 2, 1944. He was awarded the Purple Heart and received a Citation of Honor posthumously. He was married just before going overseas to Marion L. Adams of Anderson, Indiana.

BROWN, Raymond-Raymond Brown, Corporal, son of Nora and Henry Brown, was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, October 21, 1923. He attended Emmerich Manual Training High School, and was a member of the Indiana National Guard, prior to enlistment in the Marine Corps at Madison, Indiana, September 8, 1942. He was fatally wounded during the invasion of Saipan June 15, 1944. He had been previously wounded at Tarawa on November 22, 1943 and was twice awarded the Purple Heart. For distinguished service in action at Saipan, June 15-August 1, 1944 and Tarawa, November 20-24, 1943, he was awarded the Presidential Citation. Besides his parents, he is survived by a sister, Ruth E. Hogue.

BUCHANAN, Albert Stephan-Albert Stephan Buchanan, Private First Class, was born October 8, 1924, at New Marion, Indiana; son of Eva “Salyers (Housefield) and George A. Buchanan. He attended school at Benham, Indiana and was a farmer. He entered the service February 20, 1943 and had been in service a year and nine months, being overseas thirteen months when killed in action. He received the Purple Heart posthumously. He was also awarded the Bronze Star. In making this award, his Commanding Officer stated the following: “You are awarded the Bronze Star for Meritorious achievement in connection with military operations against the enemy in the European Theater of Operations from Jul 24, 1944 to September 14, 1944. The skillful, dependable and courageous manner in which you performed your duties as rifleman contributed immeasurably in the combat efficiency of your organization during the invasion of Western Europe.” Albert died November 20, 1944 of wounds received in battle and lies buried in U. S. Military Cemetery #1 at Henri Chapelle, Belgium, Plot C.C., Row 4, Grave #62. Besides his mother and two brothers, he leaves one sister, Maxine Buchanan and three Half-sisters, Mrs. Irene Sherman, Mrs. Dortha Morgan and Mrs. Lorene Sampson.

CALLAWAY, Richard Cook-Richard Cook Callaway, Private, son of Sadie and Eugene Callaway was born in Madison, Indiana January 14, 1919. He attended Madison High School and enlisted in the U. S. Army August, 1935, and served in the States and Philippine Islands until 1940. After an honorable discharge, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Army November, 1940 and served with them until his death. He attempted to get released from the Canadian Army to join the U. S. forces, but his request was denied. He was killed in action at the Gustave Line May 22, 1944, and is buried in Cissino Military Cemetery, Cissino, Italy. Besides his parents, he leaves a brother, Jack.

CAROTHERS, Paul Raymond-Paul Raymond Carothers, Private, was born in Lincoln, Illinois, August 12, 1914, son of Mrs. Anna Carothers (Gillen). He attended Lincoln grade schools and at the age of seventeen, joined on of the C. C. C. camps where he served four years. He then moved to Indiana near Madison and entered the service from Madison, Indiana, November 20, 1940. He served three years and six months with one Commanding Officer as machinist and driving trucks in the 35th tank division. He took part in the Normandy invasion, was wounded and received the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star of Meritorious Duty. He was later put on a tank for reinforcement as a tank or machine gun loader and was killed in action near Sear-union, France, December 4, 1944, and lies buried in a U. S. Cemetery in Eastern France.

CART, Raymond Lawrence-Raymond Lawrence Cart, Aviation Machinist’s Mate, Third Class, was born at Dexter, Indiana, June 3, 1924, son of Clara C. and Ralph O. Cart. He attended school at Paris Crossing, class of 1940. He entered service from Madison, Indiana, March 24, 1943 and was assigned to the Navy Air Force as a machinists. He was sent to the Pacific Theater of Operations where he took part in several operations. He was a crewman of a Navy PBY which crash landed in the Celebese on October 2, 1944. He was held a prisoner until November 24, 1944, when he and nine other American fliers were beheaded by Japanese in the Celebese Islands. For this crime, Captain Gosuke Taniguchi, Commanding Officer of the Japanese Garrison at Kendari, Clebese, was sentenced to death by a U. S. War Crimes Military Commission at Manila, February 27, 1947. He received the Air Medal for meritorious achievement in Flight as Combat Air crewmen attached to a Catalina Aircraft, in action against enemy Japanese forces at Darvel Bay, North Borneo on September 28, 1944. He contributed materially to the destruction of four enemy freighter transports, a dock with a large supply of stores and six heavily loaded cargo barges. Besides his parents he leaves two sisters, Irene and Eleanor Cart, and four brothers, Richard, Ronnie , John and Howard.

CHANDLER, James R.- James R. Chandler, Staff Sergeant, son of Mr. and Mrs. Shelley Chandler, was born in Trimble County, Kentucky, He had lived in and near Madison most of his life, having operated a dairy in Hanover Township, but was employed by an Automobile Finance Company when he entered service. Sergeant Chandler was a member of an infantry company under General Patch, Seventh Army, and was wounded in action January6, 1945. After hospitalization, he was returned to his company and was killed in action in Germany April 3, 1945. He was awarded the Bronze Star posthumously. The citation follows: “For meritorious service in France and Germany from December 7, 1944 to April 3, 1945. During this period, Sergeant Chandler performed admirable service for his unit acting in a variety of assignments. Displaying unusual qualities of versatility, he ably fulfilled his duties, aiding materially in the smooth and effective operation of the company. Sergeant Chandler’s courage, able leadership and willing devotion to duty reflect credit on himself and the armed forces.” Besides his parents, he is survived by a son and a brother, Jack.

CONSLEY, Thomas Franklin-Thomas Franklin Consley, Private son of Ruth Slater and Benjamin Franklin Consley was born at Jeffersonville, Indiana, August 4, 1921. The family moved to the Paynesville neighborhood where Thomas became a Boy Scout and was employed on farms. As a soldier he saw service in Iceland, Ireland, England, France, and Belgium. He was killed in action in battle at Luxemburg, December 30, 1944. Besides his parents he is survived by a brother Calvin Clyde Consley.

COOK, John D.-John D. Cook, Staff Sergeant, Flight Engineer and Aerial Gunner on a Flying Fortress, came to Madison from Switzerland County and worked at Charlestown as chief operator at the powder plant. He entered service from Switzerland County. He left Scott Field, Illinois, for overseas duty and arrived in England and went directly into flight duty. His mission over Germany was believed to have been one of the first, if not the first, for his B-17 bomber. He was a top turret gunner. Sergeant Cook’s death was due to oxygen mask tube trouble. He was awarded a citation of honor by the U. S. Army. Besides his wife, Doris Baker Cook, he leaves two sons Marvin James Cook and Marshall Cook, of Patriot, and two sisters, Mrs. Vernon Trinkle at Vevay and Mrs. Gladys Jones of Carroll County, Kentucky.

COPELAND, Nelson M.-Nelson M. Copeland, Private First Class, son of F. E. and Irene Copeland, Route One, was born in Bryantsburg, Indiana, Mary 14, 1920. He entered the National Guard Unit at Madison, January 7, 1938 and enlisted in the United States Army at Madison, January, 1941. He served in the Battle of Normandy, Central Europe, Battle of the Bulge and the Battle of the Rhein. He was awarded the Combat Infantry Badge, American Theater Ribbon, EAME Theater with four Bronze Stars, Good Conduct Ribbon and Victory Medal. PFC Copeland was killed in action in Germany, March 21, 1945. He is survived by his parents, four brothers, Allen, James, Paul and Wallace, his widow, Rosemary Copeland and a daughter, Rhoda Jean Copeland.

COULTER, James William-James William Coulter, Sergeant, was born in Charleston, West Virginia, February 14, 1921. He attended school in Wheeling, West Virginia and was a member of the Baptist Church. He served with the Army Engineers before the war overseas. In November 1940 he was sent back to the States for a rest, being transferred to Camp Atterbury, Indiana. In November 1944 he was again sent overseas and served in France, Germany and Belgium, where he met his death in the Battle of the Bulge on December 2, 1944. He twice received the Purple Heart and also held the Good Conduct Medal and Before Pearl Harbor Ribbon. He is survived by his widow, Mrs. Gladys Shingleton Coulter of North Madison, Indiana.

COX, Edwin David-Edwin David Cox, Private First Class, son of Charles L. and Anna Reed Cox, was born in Switzerland County, Indiana, November 5, 1917. His family later moved to the Brooksburg neighborhood where Edwin attended school and worked on farms. He attended one year at Central High School and later went to work at Richardson Rubber Products Company In Indianapolis as a Rubber Molder. He was a member of the Indiana Home Guards, Headquarters in Madison, Indiana, and assisted as guard during flood of 1937. He entered service in Indianapolis June 9, 1944. In November, 1944 he was sent overseas and served in the 10th Armored and 4th Armored Infantry Battalions of the Third Army with General Patton. His death, March 16, 1945, came as the result of injuries from explosion of a grenade as his outfit was finishing up the capture and cleaning out of the Germans in the small town of Andernach, Germany. He lies buried in the American Cemetery No. 1 at Hamm, Luxenbourg. He was awarded the Purple Heart. In Indianapolis, where Edwin had been employed since 1939, the Edwin D. Cox, V.F.W. Post was organized at No.8147 in memory of one whom they wished to honor. He is survived by his wife, Vernelle B. Cox and two daughters, Shirley Ann and Evelyn Jean, who reside in Indianapolis, Indiana.

CROZIER, William Watts-Technical Sergeant, Fifth Grade, son of Elmer and Hannah C. Crozier, was born at Madison, Indiana, December 14, 1913. He attended school at Central, Ryker’s Ridge, Madison Township, from which he graduated at the age of seventeen. After graduation, he took employment with his father with the Crozier Monumental Works, where he was employed at the outbreak of World War II. He enlisted in Battery “E” 150th Field Artillery and was in training at Camp Shelby, Miss. He was transferred to Camp Forrest, Tenn. from there to Fort Dix, NJ and from there he sailed to Africa. He landed at Casablanca sometime in February, 1943. He was killed August 29, 1943 by a fall of 350 feet from a cliff near Constantine, Algeria and is buried in the American Cemetery near that place. He was never married.

CUNDY, Norman Lewis-Private, son of Amanda (Smith) and Jesse Davis, was born at Carrollton, Kentucky, January 26, 1916. He moved to Madison with his parents while a small boy and attended Lydia Middleton Grade School and was a member of the Baptist Church. He held membership in the Eagles and I. O.O. F. Lodges. He was an electrician by trade. Private Davis entered service March 8, 1943 and after the usual training was sent to Europe and was killed in action in Northern France, July 29, 1944. He lies buried in the American Cemetery in Blotcherville, France. He was posthumously awarded the Purple Heart and Good Conduct Medal. Besides his wife, Mrs. Ethel Davis, he is survived by his mother, Mrs. George Smith and daughter, Catherine.

DEW, Harold A.-Lieutenant, son of Harriet Maud and George A. Dew, was born in Madison, Ind. June 22, 1917. He attended St. Michael’s grade school and Madison High School, and St. Mary’s Commercial College. At the time of his entry into service at Madison, June 6, 1942, he was a machinist at the R. C. A. in Indianapolis. Lieutenant Dew fought through the campaigns of North Africa, Sicily and Italy with the Fifth Army under General Clark, where he was awarded the Purple Heart. He was killed in action in Italy, November 24, 1943. He is buried in a cemetery at Naples, Italy. Besides his parents he is survived by his widow Virginia Rice, and a brother, John Frederick.

ELDRIDGE, Albert Sylvan-Seaman First Class, was born in Saluda Township, October 2, 1924, son of Pearl and Albert Eldridge. He attended school at Saluda and New Washington and entered the Navy at Indianapolis, Ind. November 14, 1942. He was a member of the Armed Guard Crew on board the S. S. Murfreesboro when it collided with a merchant ship, the El Coston, which sank immediately. Only forty were rescued from both crews. The Murfreesboro was enroute from New York to the United Kingdom, carrying high explosives. Fires swept the decks of both ships. Albert had made four trips to England and one to Africa. Surviving are his parent and a sister, Alene Eldridge.

FIELD, Thomas Wayne-Thomas Wayne Field, Corporal, son of Elizabeth and Culver Dean Field, was born at Kent, Ind. September 6, 1910. He attended Kent Schools and graduated from Hanover High School in 1928. He was a member of Kent M. E. Church, the Eagles Lodge and the Conservation Club. Prior to entering the service he was employed by the Madison-Louisville Transit Company, and served four years as depot master in Louisville, Ken. He entered the service from Fort Benjamin Harrison, February 23, 1942. Received his training at Fort Eustes, Virginia, Camp Stewart, Georgia, Camp Gordon, Georgia and then was sent to Camp George Meade, Maryland. He went overseas December 21, 1944. Landed in France January 10, 1945. Reported missing February 1, 1945 and was later reported as killed in action February 1, 1945 in Belgium while serving with the First Army, Second Div. , Nineth Reg. His parents received the Purple Heart and a letter stating that he is buried in the U. S. Military Cemetery, Henri Chapelle, Belgium, seven miles southwest of Aschen, German. He is survived by his parent, a sister, Freida Field, and two brothers, Woodrow and Culver Dean Field, Jr.

FINCH-Robert Bruce Finch, Captain, son of Florence L. and John C. Finch was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, September 22, 1919. He attended Lydia Middleton School and graduated from Madison High School in 1937. He attended Indiana University 1937-1938 and also Littleford Nelson Business College. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church. He was connected with the Tower Manufacturing Company at the time of his entry into service. He enlisted in the Army at Madison, Indiana Mar 29, 1941. He was killed in action in the Battle for Rennes, France August 3. 1944. Captain Finch is buried in the American Military Cemetery, Blosville, France, Plot W, Row 8 Grave 1942. Besides his parents, his is survived by a sister, Lillian Finch Kellerman.

FURNISH, Loren H.-Private, son of Laura and James S. Furnish was born at Vienna, Indiana February 10, 1909. He attended grade school and graduated from High School in 1928. Jack was the owner of the Red Rock Bottling Company, was a member of the Methodist Church and was affiliated with the Conservation Club, Elks Eagles and Odd Fellow Lodges. He entered the service October 26, 1943 at Fort Thomas, Kentucky and was sent to Camp Wheeler, Georgia, (Infantry) for seventeen weeks basic training. The following May he landed in England, enroute to the battle fields of France. He was killed in action July 15, 1944 at St. Lo section and is buried at Blosville, France in Plot Y, Row 10, Grave 196. Jack was awarded the Purple Heat Posthumously. He leaves his widow Mrs. Emma Nell Furnish and daughter, Nancy Lee.

GREEN, George Frazier-Seaman Second Class, son of Blanche and Fred Green was born in Madison, Indiana December 6, 1923. Attended grade school and Madison High School. He entered the service at Indianapolis January 28, 1941. He lost his life by drowning in the ocean at his post of duty while swimming for exercise on April 1, 1943 at T. T. S. A. U. S. F. A. S. Banana River, Florida. At the time of his death George had just passed his test for Ship Cook, First Class. He was a member of St. Michael’s Catholic Church. He is survived by his mother, Mrs. Blanche E. Green.

HEATH, William Norman-Corporal T-5, son of Edna and Norman Heath, was born at Sanders, Kentucky, March 25, 1915. His parents moved to Indianapolis and later to a farm in Jefferson County, where William graduated from Dupont High School, class of 1934. He attended Sunday School and church at the Middlefork Christian Church. He worked with his father on their farm until he entered service January 7, 1942. After receiving the usual training in the states, he was sent to Europe and took part in the invasion of France. He was serving with a tank destroyer division with General Patton’s Third Army when he was wounded. He died as a result of wounds September 13, 1944 and lies buried in the American Cemetery of Andill, France in Sec. A, Row 9, Grave #213. He was awarded the Purple Heart. He is survived by his widow Veta Davidson and a daughter, Mary.

HEITZ, Norbert William-Staff Sergeant, son of Mildred E. Heitz and Henry A. Heitz was born at Madison Indiana January 13, 1923. He attended school at North Madison where he graduated from high school with the class of 1941. He entered the Army Air Corps at Indianapolis February 15, 1943 and received specialized army training at Scott Field, Illinois and Lowry Field, Colorado. A tail-gunner on a B-25 Mitchell bomber, he flew over enemy target in the Netherlands, East Indies, and Philippines. He had been flying with the Crusaders, the aerial aces of the Fighting 13th Jungle Air Force. His veteran outfit had participated in the major battles of the Southwest Pacific, taken part in the campaign of the Northwest Solomons, Bismarck Archipelago and New Guinea. Sergeant Heitz had completed fifty missions when he was killed in action on the Southwest pacific area April 6, 1945. Sergeant Heitz was cited for meritorious achievement while participating in aerial flights in the Southwest Pacific. He received the Bronze Oak Leaf Cluster February 19, 1945 and the Air Medal December 28, 1944 and the Purple Heart. He was a member of the Catholic Church. He is survived by his parents , four brothers and a sister.

HOLSCLAW, John Richard-Sergeant, son of Billie J. Holsclaw and Alvin W. Holsclaw, was born in Madison, Indiana June 29, 1920. He attended grade school and graduated from Madison high School in 1939. Before entering the Army Air Corps at Indianapolis in October, 1943, he had been employed with the Allison Engineering Company. Sergeant Holsclaw was supposed to have lost his life December 18, 1944. He was with the 20th Air Forces, 497 Bomber Group from Saipan to Japan. The entire crew and plane were lost in the fifth bombing mission. He received a Citation of Honor. He is survived by his wife, Vera M. Holsclaw and a daughter Judith Ann of Louisville, Kentucky, his parents, a brother and a sister.

JACKSON, Lloyd Herschel-Sergeant, son of Freda R. and Andrew C. Jackson was born in Jefferson County December 31, 1923. He attended school in Jefferson County and graduated from high school in 1941. He was a member of the Christian Church and a farmer by occupation. He entered service September 30, 1942 and was assigned to the Army Air Force and became a gunner on a B-17. He was killed in action January 30, 1944 on a bombing mission over Brunswick, Germany. He is survived by his parents, his wife, Ruby M. Jackson, a daughter, Freida Irene Jackson, six brother and three sisters.

JOHNSON, Robert H.-Sergeant, son of Edna G. and Herbert H. Johnson, was born in Lafayette, Indiana, November 24, 1919. He attended Jefferson High School in Lafayette and was attending Indiana University before entering the service. He enlisted in the Army April 9, 1942 in Indianapolis and was a Radio Operator, Co. B, 9th Armored Infantry Battalion, 6th Armored Division, 3rd Army. He landed at Omaha Beach July 16, 1944, participated in the drive across Brittany-Loriet then across France where he was killed in action in Lorraine, France November 12, 1944. He met his death by explosion of demolition charge placed by the enemy. He was affiliated with the Christian Church and was a member of Sigma Chi Fraternity. He is survived by his parents and a sister, Marjorie Jen Johnson Fletemeyer.

JOHNSON, Tilford Addicus-Tilford Addicus Johnson, Private First Class, son of Rotha Addicus and William G. Johnson was born in Madison Indiana December 30, 1925. He attended Eggleston, Lydia Middleton and Junior High School. Before entering the service he had been employed as a cook and waiter at Blackards’ Sandwich Shop. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison March 8, 1944. After the usual training in various camps, he was sent overseas in October, 1944 and was assigned to the 311th Infantry Regiment, 28th “Lightning” Division. He was killed in action in Germany February 2, 1945. His Commanding Officer wrote his family as follows: “Tilford was a member of my command-his conduct was in keeping with the highest traditions of the U. S. Army. He was a man who was not satisfied with the best, he wanted to do better, regardless of how well he did the job.” He was awarded the Purple Heart and the Combat Infantryman Badge. He was buried in an American Cemetery at Henri Chapelle near Aachen Belgium. Later his remains were returned to the States and are now buried in Springdale Cemetery at Madison, Indiana. Besides his parents, he is survived by four brothers and five sisters.

JUDKINS, Charles Theodore-Technical Sergeant, Fourth Grade, son of Bernice E. and Edward T. Judkins, was born at Wirt, Indiana September 1, 1916. He attended school at Hanover, graduating from High School with the class of 1933 and from Hanover College with the degree of A. B. in 1937. He was interested in scouting and became an Eagle Scout. He also held membership in the Conservation Club and the Hanover Presbyterian Church. He had been employed for a few years in the C. A. Dryden Construction Firm and, at the of his enlistment in the service, he was employed by that firm assisting in the construction of the Jefferson Proving Ground. He entered the service October 16, 1942. He was killed in action near Wascheid, Germany March 5,1945 when the tank he was driving ran over an enemy mine. Sergeant Judkins ’ family received the following communication from W. A. Holbrook, Jr., Brigadier General, Commanding the Eleventh Armored Division, “Sergeant Judkins occupied a position of great responsibility and trust in his command, in which he earned the highest regard of the officers and the affection and esteem of the men. So great was his Commanding Officer’s confidence in his ability, he chose Judkins’ tank for his personal use. It was only a quirk of fate that the Commander was not in the tank when the mine was struck.” He lies buried at Foy, Belgium in the United States Cemetery, No. One. He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. He is survived by his wife, Freida B. Thornton and son, Charles Edward.

KELLER, Arthur Verbin-Sergeant, son of Maecel Parks Keller and Verbin Keller, was born in Jefferson County July 29, 1917. He attended the Scipio High School and held membership in Prospect Baptist Church, Saluda Township. He entered service July 23, 1943 and was assigned to the Air Corps as a turret gunner on a B-29 Super fortress. He was listed as “missing” on May 14, 1945 after he failed to return from a bombing mission over Nagoya, Japan. He was later declared dead by the War Department. He was a member of the 19th Bombardment Group and was on his fifth mission. He is survived by his wife, Ruth Keller and a daughter, Karen LaVerne who reside in Columbus, Indiana.

KNOEBEL, Ralph E.-Ralph E. Knoebel, First Lieutenant, son of Margaret E. and Ralph T. Knoebel, was born at Madison, Indiana January 3, 1922. He attended St. Michael’s School and graduated from Madison high School in 1939. He was a student at Purdue University at the time he entered the service December 7, 1940. He was assigned to the Air Corps and became a fighter pilot. He was killed in action June 22, 1944 while on a strafing mission near St. Quentin, France. Prior to his death he had been decorated with the Air Medal and six Oak Leaf Clusters. He was also awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. Lieutenant Knoebel was a member of St. Michael’s Church and was affiliated with the Madison Elks Lodge. He is survived by his parents and a brother, Robert D. Knoebel.

KYLE, Kenneth Alvin-Staff Sergeant, son of Mabel Irene and Raymond Kyle, was born at Hanover, Indiana December 8, 1916. He attended the Hanover schools and graduated from Hanover high School in 1935 and from Hanover College in 1939. He was affiliated with the Methodist Church and a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He entered the service at Louisville, Kentucky September 17, 1941. Staff Sergeant Kyle was killed in action June 27, 1944 while on a volunteer patrol on the Island of Saipan. For his gallant action on this patrol he was awarded the Silver Star and the Purple Heart Posthumously. He also held a citation and Oak Leaf Cluster for service during the battle of the Gilbert Islands. Besides his parents he is survived by a sister, Erma Doris Wingham.

LAW, Orville-Private, son of Bessie Burnside and John Law, was born at Deputy, Indiana October 2, 1918. He attended school at Deputy and enlisted in the Army on November 11, 1939 and trained at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He was assigned to the Reconnaissance Company, First Armored Regiment. He was then sent to Ireland and served in the North African campaign. He was wounded in landing at Anzio Beach, for which he received the Purple Heart. After recovering from his wounds he was returned to his Regiment and was killed in action July 1, 1944 about one hundred miles north of Rome. He lies buried in a Military Cemetery at Gronsetta, Italy. He is survived by his parents, three sisters and three brothers.

LEACH, Roy Lee-Private First Class, son of Lillie M. and Harry K. Leach, was born at Stamping Ground, Kentucky April 14, 1923. He was a graduate of Dupont High School, class of 1941 and was a member of the Church of God of his home community. He entered service at Madison, Indiana February 20, 1943. He was killed in action at Aachen, German on October 14, 1944. He was given a citation from his Commanding General, two Bronze Stars and the Purple Heart. His remains were returned to Dupont and he lies buried in the Dupont Cemetery.

MIX, John Edward-Son of Ethel B. and Lawrence W. Mix (grandson of George and Jesse Leland Mix of Switz. Co. IN) was born at Connersville, Indiana June 13, 1923. He was a farmer by occupation. He entered the service at Carrollton, Kentucky June 4, 1943 and served with Company A, 124th Infantry Regiment, 31st Division. He was killed in action on Mindinao, Philippine Islands May 8th, 1945. Besides his parents he is survived by two sisters and three brothers.

MCKAY, Ronald Vaughn-Technician, Fifth Grade, son of Mabel and Nathan McKay, was born at Brooksburg, Indiana November 17, 1914. He attended school at Brooksburg and graduated from Madison High School in 1932. Ronald was a member of the Baptist Church. He joined the Army May 17, 1944 and was assigned the dangerous job of Ordinance Ammunition Renovation. His job was to assist in renovating ammunition for reuse. While unloading some smokeless powder to be destroyed, and explosion occurred, killing nine men besides Ronald. He had been sent to Assam, India in April, 1945 and his death occurred two month later of June 11, 1945. He is buried in the American Military Cemetery at Panitola, Assam, India. He is survived by his wife, Bernice Schnabel McKay and son, Donald Lee, also his parents.

NEAL, John Melvin-Staff Sergeant, son of Mabel Litson and Jacob E. Neal was born in Trimble County, Kentucky October 18, 1920. He attended Eggleston and Junior high Schools and graduated from Madison High School, class of 1939 and from the Indiana Business College class of 1940. At the time of his entry into service, January 9, 1942 he was employed as a stenographer-typist, payroll division, Allison G. M. C., Indianapolis, Indiana. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison and received training at Kessler Field, Mississippi and at the Aerial Gunnery School, Las Vegas, Nevada where he received his wings and made Waist Gunner in a B-17 Flying Fortress. He also trained at Wendover Field, Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; Sioux City, Iowa; Boise, Idaho; Kearney, Nebraska and at Walla Walla, Washington where he served as instructor. He left the states May 27, 1943 and was stationed at Thorpe Abbott Air Base, England and was killed in action September 3, 1943. He received the Air Medal June 15, 943; Oak Leaf Cluster, September 5,1943; Purple Heart and Medal Presidential Citation posthumously, American Legion Gold Star Citation; E. T. O. Ribbon and American Theater Ribbon. He is survived by his parents and a brother, Richard Neal.

NORRIS, James Arthur-Corporal, son of Anna and Arthur Norris was born in Madison, Indiana June 1, 1918. He attended St. Michael’s and Madison High School and was a member of St. Michael’s Catholic Church. Jimmie had been employed at Meese, Inc., Hinkles’ Restaurant and Inglis Drug Store before going into service. He entered service April 13, 1942 and trained at Camp “Robinson, Arkansas, Fort Sill, Oklahoma and Camp Gruber, Oklahoma. He was assigned to Heavy Field Artillery and was overseas five months before his death. He was killed in action near Etempes France on August 31, 1944 and is buried in a Military Cemetery near Etempes, thirty miles from Paris. He was awarded the Purple Heart and the Citation of Honor from the President of the United States, posthumously.

ORRILL, Harold William-Private First Class, son of Mabel Athey and Charles E. Orrill was born at Madison, Indiana, August 1, 1918. He attended Lydia Middleton School and graduated from Madison High School in the class of 1936. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church and a member of the Western Fire Company No. 3. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison March 5, 1942. He was killed in action in the Battle of the Bulge in southern Luxembourg while serving with Anti-tank Company 109th Regiment, 28th Division. He was awarded the Purple Heart and Presidential Citation. He is survived by his parents and a brother Edward.

REA, Emily, Red Cross Staff Worker, daughter of Laura and Robert Rea was born in Madison, Indiana. She was graduated from Madison high School and from Hanover College, where she was a member of Alpha Delta Pi.
For a few years she was employed in the Federal Land Bank at Louisville, Kentucky. From there she went to Frankfort, Kentucky where she served as secretary to former Governor A. B. Chandler and Keene Johnson. Offering her services in the war effort, she enlisted for Red Cross service and was sent overseas. For several months she served at a rest center for pilots and air crew members at Bedford, England where she assisted in providing recreation and entertainment for members of the air force who were sent to the Red Cross Stations for rest after they had completed so many missions. After the invasion of France and Germany she was transferred to Paris, where she had been doing Red Cross work. Emily was killed in an airplane crash April 14, 1945 near the Isle of Man. She had been granted a leave April 12 to come home and her plane was near the Isle of Man in the Irish Sea between England and Ireland when the crash occurred. In addition to the parents she is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Max Healey and Miss Margaret Rea, with the diplomatic services at La Paz, Bolivia, South America.

REED, Lester-Lester Reed, Corporal, son of Dessie and Harry Reed, born July 1921 in Canaan, Indiana attended school at Canaan and was a farmer by occupation. He entered the service at Madison, Indiana in August of 1942. He was killed July 18, 1945 at Marseille, France and is buried at Laynes, France. He was awarded the Good Conduct Medal; E. T. O. with one Silver Service Star for the Normandy, North France, Ardenes, Rhineland and Central Europe Campaigns; Bronze Arrowhead for invasion of Normandy; American Theater Ribbon; World War II Victory Ribbon and Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar.

REED, Richmond Carlyle-Staff Sergeant, son of Maude and Leslie Reed was born in Jefferson County February 3, 1923. He attended schools at Moorefield, Indiana, Brushy Fork and graduated from Central high School, class of 1941. He was affiliated with the Macedonia Baptist Church and before entering service worked as an airplane mechanic at Akron, Ohio. He entered the service February 13, 1943 and took training at Las Vegas, Nevada and Alexandria, Louisiana. He left for the European Theater and was stationed at a base in England where he became waist gunner and second engineer on a B-17 Flying Fortress. His plane was reported to have exploded and crashed over the English Channel off the Island of Guernsey as they were on a mission to Fontaubault, France. He was awarded the European Theater Ribbon; Five Oak Leaf Cluster; Purple Heart; Three Air medals; Good Conduct Medal and the Presidential Citation. Surviving are his father, four sisters and a brother.

RENSCHLER, Lester Carroll-Private First Class, son of Katie J. Ranschler and Clarence Renschler was born at Lexington, Indiana, August 18, 1922. He attended school at Pleasant Point. He enlisted in the Army at Indianapolis, March 22, 1943 and received his infantry training at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri and Camp Pickett, Virginia. He left for overseas duty in October, 1943 and was killed in action November 6, 1944 while serving with General Hodges’ Third Army. He was awarded a Combat Infantryman Badge. Besides his parents his is survived by three sisters and a brother.

RICHMOND, Forest Elmo-Staff Sergeant, son of Lora F. and Robert Richmond was born in Kentucky January 10, 1915. He attended school at Hanover, Indiana and Hanover College where he pledged Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. He was affiliated with the National Rifle Association and was a member of the Hanover Presbyterian Church. For a time he served as assistant Hanover postmaster. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison December 5, 1942. He was a member of the 63rd Infantry training at Camp Beale, California and at Camp Bowie, Texas. He was sent overseas from Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi. He was overseas six months when he was killed by a shrapnel burst on April 2, 1945 while his company was advancing on tanks against the enemy in the vicinity of Sinsheim, Germany. He was awarded to Bronze star and the Purple heat, posthumously. He is survived by his parents, his wife, Norma and a son, William Larry.

RIGHTHOUSE, Robert Lee-Private, son of Hattie Bowman and Floyd Allen Righthouse, was born in Clark County, Indiana. He attended school in New Washington. He was a member of the Moose Lodge and was a carpenter by occupation. He entered the service from Jefferson County and was a member of the 504th Division of Paratroopers. He was killed in action in Belgium on January 7, 1945. He was awarded the Purple heart posthumously. His body was returned to the states and lies buried in the Dupont Cemetery. He is survived by his wife, Olanda Ray Righthouse and a son, Joseph Bowan Righthouse.

SHADDY, Walter Frederick-Private, son of Deana and Ensley Shaddy, was born at Moorefield, Indiana on September 25, 1917. He attended school at Moorefield, later moving to Brooksburg in Jefferson County. He was a farmer by occupation. He was a member of the Macedonia Church. He entered the Army January 16, 1941 and saw four years of service. He was killed on the Island of Luzon, February 26, 1945. Surviving are his parents and three brothers.

SMITH, William F.-Private First Class, son of Golden and John L. Smith was born at Patriot, Indiana on September 29, 1921. Later his family moved to Graham Township, Jefferson County, Indiana where William attended Deputy High School. He entered the service August of 1942 and was assigned to the infantry. He was killed in action April 10, 1945 in the vicinity of Frielinghausen, Germany by a sniper bullet and is buried in a Military Cemetery at Bruenna, German in Plot A, Row 5, Grave 93.

SPENCER, Alton Lansing-Private First Class, son of Doris and Harry M. Spencer, was born in Canaan, Indiana on January 15, 1922. he attended Canaan School and Central High School. He was a farmer by occupation and a member of Hicks Baptist Church. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison on October 19, 1942 and was assigned to the 119th Infantry, 30th Division, Company C. He was killed in the invasion of Normandy on July 13, 1944 and is buried in the United States Cemetery at La Combe, France. He was awarded the Purple Heart and Good Conduct Medal. Besides his parents, his is survived by a sister and a brother.

STAPLE, Clarence Melton-Clarence Melton Staples was the son of Lucinda and Warren L. Staples and was born in New Castle, Kentucky on March 7, 1926. Later his family moved to Saluda Township, Jefferson County, Indiana. He attended school at New Washington, Indiana and was in his third year at Saluda High School when he entered the Marine Corps on June 28, 1944. He was a member of the First Division of the Marine Corps and after six months training was sent overseas and was killed in action on Okinawa. He had served overseas five months. Besides his parents he is survived by two brothers.

STEPHENSON, George Evin-Private, son of Nannie E. Barnes and Robert Lee Stephenson was born at Madison, Indiana on January 21, 1911. He attended Madison public schools and two years in High School. He was a member of the First Baptist Church and Eagles Lodge and the No. 3 Fire Company. Prior to entering the service, he was employed as a Fire Guard at Jefferson Proving Ground. He entered the service at Madison, Indiana December 23, 1943. He was killed in action in Italy, January 26, 1944. Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother.

STRASSMEIR, William Roger-Staff Sergeant, son of Sadie Bell and Frederick Strassmeir, was born in Milton, Kentucky, February 6, 1922. He attended school at Milton, and his family later moved to Jefferson County, Indiana. He was affiliated with the St. Paul Lutheran Church and was an electric welder before entering service June 1, 1942. He chose the Army air Corps and was assigned as a member of a B-24 Bomber Crew. He was killed in the European Area. His B-24 bomber was struck by anti-aircraft fire during a raid October 1, 1943 over Weiner Newstadt, Austria. A member of his crew wrote the following to William’s parents, “It is with deep regret that I write this. I have very little information concerning your son. We flew from Tunis, October 1, 1943 and were hit as we neared our target. Sgt. Strassemeir was in the upper turret. The explosion was terrific. Your son gave his life in the raid.” Sergeant Strassmeir was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. Besides his parents, he is survived by a brother and sister.

TEMPERLY, George Richard-Sergeant, son of Margaret and Oliver P. Temperly was born at Kent, Indiana February 8, 1905. He attended school at Kent and was a member of the Methodist Church and the Masonic Lodge. Before entering service he had been employed as a truck operator. He entered the service March 9, 1942 and after the usual training in the States he was sent overseas. He was killed action in eastern France on November 16, 1944. He is survived by his parents and two brothers.

THOMPSON, Lee Thomas-Private First Class, son of Lula K. and Raymond Thompson, was born at Gest, Kentucky, August 2, 1921. He moved with his parents to Milton Township, Jefferson County where he attended school and worked as a farmer. He entered service at Louisville, Kentucky, June 20, 1939 and was killed in action in Normandy, France August 2, 1944. he is survived by his parents, a sister and a brother.

TILLEY, Ira Porter-Private First Class, son of Nellie and John E. Tilley, was born in Milton, Kentucky on July 4, 1919. While a small boy his parents moved to Saluda Township, Jefferson County where Ira attended school and was a member of the Paynesville Christian Church. He worked at farming before volunteering for service October 21, 1940. He entered the service at Fort Benjamin Harrison and was assigned to the Infantry. He was killed in action in France on September 20, 1944 and is buried in a Military Cemetery near Lorrraine, France. He is survived by his parents, two sisters and two brothers.

TULL, Paul Edward-Lieutenant, son of Elizabeth and Harold J. Tull, was born at Hanover, Indiana on June 24, 1918. He attended school at Hanover and graduated from Hanover College, class of 1940, and was a member of Phi Gammi Delta Fraternity. He was a member of the Methodist Church. He entered the service at Indianapolis on June 14, 1941. He was overseas just twenty-three days when he was killed June 23, 1943 at an air base in England when a bomb exploded while being loaded into a plane. He was a bombardier on a B-17. He is survived by his parents, his wife, three sisters and three brothers.

Walters, George Frank-Private First Class, of the Marine Corps, son of Cecil Phillips and George W. Walters, was born at Madison, Indiana on July 7, 1921. he attended Lydia Middleton school and graduated from Madison high School, class of 1941. he affiliated with the Methodist Church and Odd Fellows Lodge.
He entered service at Indianapolis on March 2, 1942 and served twenty-seven months overseas. He was in the invasion of Iwo Jima, Guam and Bougainville. He died in service October 16, 1945. Survivors are his parents and two brothers.

Wallace, Edward R.-Technical Sergeant, son of Ada B. and Harry R. Wallace, was born at Covington, Kentucky on April 6, 1921. Early in life he moved to Shelby Township and attended school there. He was a farmer until he entered service at Madison, Indiana on August 24, 1940. He was assigned to Co. E, 39th Infantry, 9th Division. He participated in the N. African Invasion until he was wounded on March 29, 1943 near Tunis. After forty days of hospitalization, he was returned to active duty. He also participated in the Sicilian Campaign. He returned to England and took part in the Normandy Invasion where he was active until he was killed on July 19, 1944 at LePature, France. He had been awarded the Purple Heart, Good Conduct medal, Infantry Combat Badge, Presidential Citation and the Bronze Star Medal. The Bronze Star Medal was awarded posthumously. The following is a copy of the presidential Citation: “In grateful memory of Tec/Sgt. Edward R. Wallace, A. S. #15043403, who died in service of his country in the European Area July 19, 1944. He stands in the unbroken line of Patriots who have dared to die, that freedom might live and grow, and increase its blessings. Freedom lives, and through it, he lives in a way that humbles the undertakings of most men.”

WEDDING, Robert Cullen-Technical Fifth Grade, son of Eva and John W. Wedding, was born at Connersville, Indiana, August 21, 1917. He was a member of the Catholic Church and had spent most of his life on a farm. He entered the service August 21, 1942 and was sent to Panama with the Coast Artillery where he served twenty-one months. He was returned to the States and transferred to the Infantry and was sent overseas, joining the Sixth Army (Rainbow Div.) in France and had been in combat but a short time when reported killed, Januaary 9, 1945. He is survived by his wife, Erma R. Wedding, and a son, Carroll Gene of Lexington, Indiana.

WYATT, Charles Norwood-Fireman, Second Class, son of Dollie Still Lasby and Wheeler B. Wyatt, was born at Madison, Indiana, December 17, 1923. He attended school in Indianapolis, Indiana and was a member of the United Bretheran Church. He entered the Navy December 18, 1941 serving aboard the John Penn and later transferred to U. S. S. Hugh L. Scott, which was torpedoed off the north coast of Africa on November 12, 1942. Charles lost his life when the ship was sunk. He was awarded the Purple Heart posthumously. He is survived by his parents and a sister, Mrs. Beretha Wyatt Claghorn.

YORK, Clyde B.-M. M. C. First Class, Coastguardsman, son of Daisy S. and McKinley York, was born in Clay County, Kentucky. His family moved to Saluda Township, Jefferson County, Indiana where Clyde attended school, graduating from High School, class of 1940. He entered the Coast Guard on May 30, 1940. He was lost at sea while on convoy duty in the North Atlantic aboard the U. S. S. Escanaba. He is survived by his parents, three sisters and three brothers.