Browse Collection: Transportation (13 total)

The Clicquot, pronounced "klee-ko," Ginger Ale Company was born in Millis, Mass., in the 1880s. At one time it owned bottling companies all over the United States. It shipped its soda drinks all over the world. At first ginger ale was all that was bottled, but later flavors were added such as…

The horse drawn wagon gave way to progress and Pearl Packing Company modernized its distribution system by using the trucking system. Here Cutter Robinson and Charles Hollis are seen carrying ice blocks from the truck. With all the ice and snow around them, one would wonder how good business could…

This bus was as Mr. Lemen described it an "old Reo" owned by Southland Transportation Company headquartered at the Central Hotel. In this picture, the bus is parked in front of the Central Hotel. We do not find the business in the 1925 directory so it may have been in business only a short time…

From the notes of Harry Lemen: "John M. Collins and Old Bus (Red "Speedwagon") waiting for train to come in at Madison Depot. (1978-Wilco Electric Co.) Bus is setting on site of Boys Club."

The only information we have is a note written by Harry Lemen concerning this picture. "Electric car (Lawrence Smith's). Madison's only one. Parked in front of Weber Home, 712 West Main Street."

Pearl Packing Company was one of the largest pork packing producers in the area and an offshoot of that business was an ice producing plant. In the early- to mid-1900s ice wagons plied the streets with huge blocks of ice. Citizens and businesses would tell the driver how much ice they needed and…

According to Harry Lemen's commentary, this was the last horse drawn coal wagon in Madison. Notice the smaller wheels in the front of the wagon. This was for maneuvering into tight spaces. Many folks who had coal furnaces will remember the clinkers that formed from the coal. A lot of the…

The white bus ran the route between Madison and Indianapolis. It is pictured here at 310 Walnut Street. It evolved into the White Star Line run by Bill Lockridge.

This school hack was from the Ryker's Ridge School area. We don't know exactly where or when it was in use. The school hack, despite its primitive looks, was a novel and improved mode of transportation. Without the hack, choices were walking, riding your own horse if there was one to spare, or an…

Coal oil wagon at the Vernon Street watering trough. In the late 1800's and early 1900's coal oil, or kerosene, was much in demand. It was used for, among other things, lamps and heating. One obscure use was as a deterrent to chiggers while blackberry picking. A rag with a few drops of kerosene…