Browse Collection: Industry & Trade (14 total)

An early view of the Tower Manufacturing Co. at 110-112 Depot St. The drawing was published in 1899 when the factory was only four years old. According to the May 18, 1899 issue of the Madison Daily Democrat "It turns out tons and tons of cat nails, wire nails and brads, and every description of…

Madison had suffered several setbacks economically. It was once a great pork packing center but that industry waned as the big packing plants in the large cities gained magnitude. The woolen mills had begun to slow or close down and it was the same with the big flour mills and starch factories. …

Fordyce Woolen Mill's slogan said it all, "The Home of Good Blankets." This mill was the original Schofield Woolen Mill, founded in 1877 by J. Schofield. In the mid 1920s when Mr. Schofield died, the company became the Fordyce Woolen Mills. It was later the Meyers and Sons Manufacturing Company.…

Fordyce Woolen Mill's slogan said it all, "The Home of Good Blankets." This mill was the original Schofield Woolen Mill, founded in 1877 by J. Schofield. In the mid 1920's when Mr. Scholfield died, the company became the Fordyce Woolen Mills. It was later the Meyers and Sons Manufacturing…

Originally built as the J. Schofield and Sons Woolen Mills in 1877 and continued as such for about 50 years. After the death of the founder in 1925 operations were briefly suspended, but the company was reorganized and the Fordyce Textile Manufacturing Company was formed to take over the business…

In 1858 William Trow and William Stapp, as partners, bought the little mill on the northwest corner of West and Second Streets from W. W. Page, Sr. (see Page's Mill and Feed Store). The "little mill on the corner" was soon outgrown and casting about for a larger facility. Trow and Stapp found the…

In 1858 William Trow and William Stapp, as partners, bought the little mill on the northwest corner of West and Second Streets from W. W. Page, Sr. (see Page's Mill and Feed Store). The "little mill on the corner" was soon outgrown and casting about for a larger facility. Trow and Stapp found the…

In 1858 William Trow and William Stapp, as partners, bought the little mill on the northwest corner of West and Second Streets from W. W. Page, Sr. (see Page's Mill and Feed Store). The "little mill on the corner" was soon outgrown and casting about for a larger facility. Trow and Stapp found the…

Another view of building with workers assembled for a picture. Note the old horse-drawn dray with beer barrels.

This photo is taken from Harry Lemen's personal collection. It shows the brewery workers in front of the building. Note their hats and the sign on the building.